broadcastarchive-umd:

Digitization of Historical Audio Collections with Irene:

In 2013, the Northeast Document Conservation Center was awarded a $250,000 National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop, test, and demonstrate a new digital reformatting service for early audio recordings on grooved media using IRENE (above), a system developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and successfully tested at the Library of Congress. [more]

Unlocking Sounds of the Past:

The idea for IRENE was conceived when Carl Haber and Vitaliy Fadeyev, scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, heard Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart discuss on a radio program the loss of cultural heritage through the chemical breakdown of recordings. [more]
Why, they wondered, couldn’t we just make high-resolution images of a disc and use the pictures to extract the data embedded in the grooves? Why couldn’t software then convert that data into sound?
Haber and Fadayev experimented with the idea over 2003 and ’04. Eventually, a workable system was born and named IRENE – after the first record from which they managed to extract sound, “Goodnight, Irene” by the Weavers.
(The name then was reverse-engineered into an acronym: “Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etc.”)
With IRENE, a light shined onto a disc or cylinder reflects into a high-resolution camera mounted overhead. The camera makes images of the lateral motion of the groove – more than 2 million images for a typical 78 rpm recording. Software analyzes the motion of the grooves shown in those images, then converts the data into sound.
The system also helps preserve fragile historic material: Because a camera reads the grooves of a recording, the delicate discs are spared the wear inflicted by repeated physical contact of a stylus. [more]

broadcastarchive-umd:

Digitization of Historical Audio Collections with Irene:

In 2013, the Northeast Document Conservation Center was awarded a $250,000 National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop, test, and demonstrate a new digital reformatting service for early audio recordings on grooved media using IRENE (above), a system developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and successfully tested at the Library of Congress. [more]

Unlocking Sounds of the Past:

The idea for IRENE was conceived when Carl Haber and Vitaliy Fadeyev, scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, heard Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart discuss on a radio program the loss of cultural heritage through the chemical breakdown of recordings. [more]

Why, they wondered, couldn’t we just make high-resolution images of a disc and use the pictures to extract the data embedded in the grooves? Why couldn’t software then convert that data into sound?

Haber and Fadayev experimented with the idea over 2003 and ’04. Eventually, a workable system was born and named IRENE – after the first record from which they managed to extract sound, “Goodnight, Irene” by the Weavers.

(The name then was reverse-engineered into an acronym: “Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etc.”)

With IRENE, a light shined onto a disc or cylinder reflects into a high-resolution camera mounted overhead. The camera makes images of the lateral motion of the groove – more than 2 million images for a typical 78 rpm recording. Software analyzes the motion of the grooves shown in those images, then converts the data into sound.

The system also helps preserve fragile historic material: Because a camera reads the grooves of a recording, the delicate discs are spared the wear inflicted by repeated physical contact of a stylus. [more]

The Wednesday Biz: Intellectual Property - Your Creative Rights

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Intellectual Property - Your Creative Rights Class on Tuesday, April 22 from 6-7:30 PM at the Business & Career Library


Whether an entrepreneur, artist, writer or musician, you may be able to claim ownership of your idea or work. Volunteers from the New York City Bar’s Neighborhood Entrepreneur Law Project will answer questions about what you can protect, the difference between trademarks, copyrights and patents, and the limits to your legal rights.

Please register at www.bklynpubliclibrary.org/locations/business/events or call 718.623.7000 and choose option 4.

thebrooklyncollection:

Curious about our hot-off-the-presses digital newspaper resource, Brooklyn Newsstand?  Did you know it offers the full run of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper from 1841 - 1955?  Learn more about this site and how to use it at one of our upcoming workshops, in the Info Commons Lab on the first floor of the Central Library.  No advance registration required.

thebrooklyncollection:

Curious about our hot-off-the-presses digital newspaper resource, Brooklyn Newsstand?  Did you know it offers the full run of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper from 1841 - 1955?  Learn more about this site and how to use it at one of our upcoming workshops, in the Info Commons Lab on the first floor of the Central Library.  No advance registration required.